Bind dynamically updating a zone

Traditionally, DNS has been set up by creating entries - called resource records - in text files called zone files.A typical address record for a host would look like this: This assumes that the host alpha has permanently been allocated the address 10.0.0.52.

The nsupdate command can easily be invoked from within a script which picks up the required values from the variables in the info file created by dhcpcd.Here is a simple example: file# us up | down | new# is "-d" if dhcpcd was started with -d debug flag# define some local config variables here MYDNS=fulbert.cullen.au# Source the info fileif [ !

The nsupdate command can easily be invoked from within a script which picks up the required values from the variables in the info file created by dhcpcd.

Here is a simple example: file# $2 us up | down | new# $3 is "-d" if dhcpcd was started with -d debug flag# define some local config variables here MYDNS=fulbert.cullen.au# Source the info fileif [ ! $1echo Our IP address is $IPADDR and hostname $HOSTNAMEcase "$2" in "new") # Update the name server with our info nsupdate -d -k Kfreya2-fulbert. BIND will accept dynamic updates from any address in the range(s) specified in the allow-update substatement.

IP addresses can be easily spoofed, especially for the UDP protocol which is used here.

It can be turned on by creating an allow-update substatement, either in the options section of /etc/named.conf, or in a zone statement: This will allow hosts on the network 192.168.0.0 to make dynamic updates on this DNS. " list will probably be empty, as the DNS entries will be supplied by the DHCP server.

If the DNS is a master for several zones, you might have to place the allow-update substatement inside only those zones where it is required: For Windows XP client workstations, for example, open the Properties for a Local Area Connection, click on "Internet Protocol (TCP/IP", then click on properties, click on "Advanced...", click the DNS tab. Now check "Register this connection's addresses in DNS" near the bottom of the dialog, and optionally "Use this connection's DNS suffix in DNS registration", if using a notebook which might be connected to several different domains. Now, as you boot the Windows clients, they will automatically update their entries in the domain name server's zone database.

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The nsupdate command can easily be invoked from within a script which picks up the required values from the variables in the info file created by dhcpcd.Here is a simple example: file# $2 us up | down | new# $3 is "-d" if dhcpcd was started with -d debug flag# define some local config variables here MYDNS=fulbert.cullen.au# Source the info fileif [ ! $1echo Our IP address is $IPADDR and hostname $HOSTNAMEcase "$2" in "new") # Update the name server with our info nsupdate -d -k Kfreya2-fulbert. BIND will accept dynamic updates from any address in the range(s) specified in the allow-update substatement.IP addresses can be easily spoofed, especially for the UDP protocol which is used here.It can be turned on by creating an allow-update substatement, either in the options section of /etc/named.conf, or in a zone statement: This will allow hosts on the network 192.168.0.0 to make dynamic updates on this DNS. " list will probably be empty, as the DNS entries will be supplied by the DHCP server.If the DNS is a master for several zones, you might have to place the allow-update substatement inside only those zones where it is required: For Windows XP client workstations, for example, open the Properties for a Local Area Connection, click on "Internet Protocol (TCP/IP", then click on properties, click on "Advanced...", click the DNS tab. Now check "Register this connection's addresses in DNS" near the bottom of the dialog, and optionally "Use this connection's DNS suffix in DNS registration", if using a notebook which might be connected to several different domains. Now, as you boot the Windows clients, they will automatically update their entries in the domain name server's zone database.

echo Our IP address is $IPADDR and hostname $HOSTNAMEcase "" in "new") # Update the name server with our info nsupdate -d -k Kfreya2-fulbert. BIND will accept dynamic updates from any address in the range(s) specified in the allow-update substatement.IP addresses can be easily spoofed, especially for the UDP protocol which is used here.It can be turned on by creating an allow-update substatement, either in the options section of /etc/named.conf, or in a zone statement: This will allow hosts on the network 192.168.0.0 to make dynamic updates on this DNS. " list will probably be empty, as the DNS entries will be supplied by the DHCP server.If the DNS is a master for several zones, you might have to place the allow-update substatement inside only those zones where it is required: For Windows XP client workstations, for example, open the Properties for a Local Area Connection, click on "Internet Protocol (TCP/IP", then click on properties, click on "Advanced...", click the DNS tab. Now check "Register this connection's addresses in DNS" near the bottom of the dialog, and optionally "Use this connection's DNS suffix in DNS registration", if using a notebook which might be connected to several different domains. Now, as you boot the Windows clients, they will automatically update their entries in the domain name server's zone database.

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